My New Venture: Teaching Online Courses

Every year in autumn as soon as the weather gets cool, I get the same urge: to teach. I think this stems from all the years of going to back to school. Well, that and for a long time now I’ve wanted to be a college professor. The bad news is I can’t afford to go back to school (again – I have 2 bachelors and a masters degree), so that PhD is going to have to wait.

But this past fall I embarked on a new venture aimed at satisfying my inner teacher (while hopefully earning some extra money): creating online classes. After researching many possible platforms, I chose to go with Teachable. Then I developed a series of 12 business and craft classes to launch my school, Professional Author Academy. But between my full-time job and releasing a book in November, I’ve just now launched the classes.

I love this option because it gives me a chance to take all the presentations I’ve done for speaking engagements (and a few new ones) and expand them out to people who wouldn’t otherwise be able to come see me speak. And it gives me something to do with all this knowledge and experience in my head. (In addition to the degrees I mentioned earlier, I have 15 years of professional experience in marketing. Here’s my whole list of qualifications.)

I’m a firm believer that one should never stop learning, so I’ve created classes for different skill levels from aspiring author to multi-published, as well as indie and traditionally published. These courses can be taken anyone:

  • How to Write Back Cover Copy That Sells
  • Marketing Plans for Authors
  • Business Plans for Authors
  • Branding for Authors
  • Websites and Social Media for Authors
  • Self-Editing
  • Writing Historical Fiction
  • Setting and Description

These are geared only to indie authors:

  • Steps to Self Publishing
  • Self Publishing 101
  • Audio Books for Indie Authors
  • Legal Issues for Indie Authors

See a complete course catalogue, including course descriptions. Samples are available for each course (just click on the course you’re interested in from the main page for Professional Author Academy and you’ll see a video on the top left) so you can see what you’re getting before you commit. Plus, if you want to experience my online teaching style, the How to Write Back Cover Copy That Sells course is free, so there’s no risk to you.

Convenient and Reasonably Priced
I know what it’s like to try to fit learning into a life already filled with work, family, writing and other responsibilities. That’s why they are short; most are around 30 mins and none exceed 2 hours. Plus, they don’t require any homework and can be taken at your own pace. All courses include a welcome video and narrated Powerpoint slides. Many also include a recommended reading list and other handouts for reference or use as a worksheet or template.

In addition, they are cheaper than your average college course, which runs about $1,500/course (at $500/credit hour), or even many Writer’s Digest Online Workshops, which average between $200-$600+. I offer a tiered pricing structure based on the amount of information in each course. You can pay all at once or installments.

Mini – Free (so you can try before you buy)

  • Back Cover Copy That Sells

Basic – $100/course

  • Legal Issues for Indie Authors
  • Writing Setting and Description

Standard – $200/course

  • Audio Books for Indie Authors
  • Business Plans for Authors
  • Self-Editing

Advanced$300/course

  • Branding for Authors
  • Website and Social Media for Authors
  • Steps to Self Publishing

Premium – $500/course

  • Marketing Plans for Authors
  • Writing Historical Fiction

Premier – $1,000/course

  • Self Publishing 101 (This course is several courses in one, including Steps to Self Publishing, Business Plans, Marketing Plans, Legal Issues, Web and Social Media. If you bought the classes separately, you’d pay more than $1,400.)

To register, just head over to Professional Author Academy.

Stay Up to Date
I’m planning to add new courses several times a year, so if you’d like to be notified when there is a new course or a current course goes on sale, please sign up for my course newsletter.

But for now, since the classes are done, I’m going to take off my teacher hat and put my writer one back on. It will be nice to think about fiction for a while again! Mistress of Legend calls to me, as does Isolde’s currently untitled story.

Have you ever taken online classes? If so where? What was your experience like? Do you have questions about my courses? What other subjects would you like to see?

Five Additional Ways to Make Money as An Author

 

Purchased from Adobe Stock

I’ve had money on my mind a lot lately…mainly because I need more of it.

Despite what the general public thinks, most authors are not rolling in money. In fact, I’ve heard that up to 90% of authors have a day job to support their writing.

But even if you’re lucky enough to write full-time, chances are good you wouldn’t mind a little extra dough. The good news is there are relatively easy (and legal!) ways to make additional cash as a writer, even if you already have another job. And doing so can benefit your writing career because each of these things gets your name out there, establishes credibility and  introduces you to potential new readers.

  1. Teach – Even you don’t have a master’s or PhD, think about community college or other methods of continuing education. And don’t forget online courses. No matter what type of writing you do, there is something you can teach others about. It might be something in the craft of writing (world-building, dialogue, creating outstanding characters, editing, etc.) or maybe marketing (how to write ad copy, how to get media attention, etc.) or not even related to writing at all (public speaking tips, painting, knitting, who knows!) Some people even do things like how tarot can help with writing or how to do energy healing to rev up your writing life. Chances are good if you know how to do it, someone else wants to learn. If you’re doing online classes, look into Udemy, Teachable, Thinkific and others. This Forbes article does a great job comparing them. One plus: unless your course needs updating, it’s passive income once you’ve developed it.
  2. Freelance – Many authors offer editorial, proofreading, or query/synopsis writing services. Just make sure you’re really an expert in whatever services you’re selling and that you have the time to take on clients; the last thing you want to do is hurt your reputation by providing shoddy work. Also consider writing articles for paying publications. Many professional organizations (such as RWA or Novelists Inc.) pay their members for newsletter articles. You might also look into local publications and blogs to see if they hire freelance writers.
  3. Speak – If you aren’t afraid of getting up in front of people, this can be a profitable side gig. As with teaching, everyone has specialties, and you can often speak about your books. Superstar authors can demand five and six figure fees, but when you are starting out, start small. Speak for free to develop both your skills and your resume. Local libraries and writing groups are always looking for guests that don’t charge much. (Many will “pay” you by taking you out to eat after. I’m all about free food.) Then maybe graduate to local, regional and genre conferences – this is usually when you begin to get paid. After that, you can think about possibly joining a speaker’s bureau where you can start to make some serious cash.
  4. Ghostwrite – This one doesn’t get your name out there, but it can be lucrative and gives you great writing experience, plus contacts in the publishing industry. I haven’t done this myself with fiction (I don’t think I could swallow my pride and see someone else take credit for my work) but I know a few people who have. If you’re interested in getting started, Roz Morris, who was a ghostwriter for many years, has a great article on what to do and what to expect. And here’s an online course you can take from Roz.
  5. Merchandise your books – I have a friend named Leanna Hieber who makes and sells Victorian jewelry that ties into her gothic gaslamp fiction. If you’re crafty, you could sell just about anything related to your time period, genre, characters, or the subject or setting of your books. Think cookbooks, trading cards, clothing, household decorations…the possibilities are really endless. Then, like Leanna, you could also sell those things alongside your books when you go to conventions – a win-win for you.

Personally, I’m working on adding online classes to my website, writing articles for paying publications (actually, the one I was originally going to write here will now be submitted to one), and moving into the paying speaking realm.

And then there is the ultimate advice for any writer: WRITE MORE BOOKS!! 🙂

I know there are other opportunities to increase your income that I’m not thinking of. Please let me know if you have any other ideas!